Site Search

Custom Search

Monday, February 27, 2012

Slandered/libelled Tory election campaign contractors fight back

Thanks to Blogging Tories’ Stephen Taylor, we have learned that two firms contracted by the Conservative Party of Canada during the last federal election, RackNine Inc. and Campaign Research Inc., have served a Notice of Libel pursuant to s.5(1) of the Libel and Slander Act on the NDP’s Winnipeg Centre member of parliament, Pat Martin.

Copies of the legal documents are here and here.

Legislators can slander with impunity (parliamentary immunity) during parliamentary proceedings. Once outside the House, however, they are subject to the laws of the land like everyone else.

Pat Martin has been especially imprudent when discussing the so-called robo-call affair, and he is well-known for his “colourful”—sometimes vulgar—media quotes. He is listed on his web site as NDP Critic of the Canadian Wheat Board, and he seems to crave more media attention than he’s likely to get with such a junior post.

It’ll be fun to see how this bully weasels out of this one.

© 2012 Russell G. Campbell

 

 

4 comments — This is a moderated blog and comments will appear when approved. Please don’t resubmit if your comment doesn’t appear immediately, and please do not post material that is obscene, harassing, defamatory, or otherwise objectionable.

  1. Being on the left means never having to say sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  2. When asked by a tv honcho he said he has not said anything to apologize for.

    ReplyDelete
  3. These companies are both going to be exterminated.

    Filing SLAPP suits against legislators would prove guilt on both companies' part. It's a desperate move. They'd send simple requests for fairness and apology without the legalese if they weren't so obviously guilty that they fear the debate continuing. The lawyers who gave them this bad advice may well be trying to heat this situation up.

    The Supreme Court of Canada is going to throw out any such suit, period. The public interest and qualifications of the speaker and his right to have opinions is unquestionable. This ends the history of the common law of libel in Canada, as if the US SPEECH Act and reforms in AU, NZ and other Commonwealth countries weren't enough clues.

    It would be great to see the Cadman affair get serious inquiry again once these new SLAPPs fail.

    ReplyDelete

ShareThis