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Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Quebec election: Liberal majority, PQ rebounds, ADQ collapses

Liberal premier Jean Charest rolled the dice with an early election and won his majority—66 seats, 42 per cent of the popular vote. Though a slim one, this victory made Charest the first premier since the 1950s to win three terms in a row. And, less than two years after losing it, Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois has regained Official Opposition status for her party—51 seats, 35 per cent—making her the province’s first female Opposition leader.

The big looser on the night was Action Démocratique du Québec (ADQ) which fell from 41 seats to a mere 7—not sufficient to maintain official party status in the Quebec legislature. Mario Dumont has announced he is stepping down as leader.

Party

Elected

Leading

Total

%

 LIB

66

0

66

42.06

PQ

51

0

51

35.15

ADQ

7

0 7 16.35

QS

1 0 1 3.80
GRN

0

0 0 2.19

OTH

0

0 0 .45

Updated: Dec. 9, 2008, 1:11 AM EST

In yet another election, the voters resoundingly defeated (no seats) the Green Party. However, yet another left-wing party has won a seat—community activist and physician Amir Khadir the Québec Solidaire (QS) candidate was elected in the Montreal riding of Mercier, beating Parti Québécois incumbent Daniel Turp.

Disappointingly, a mere 56.5 per cent of eligible voters cast a ballot, the lowest election turnout in the province since 1927.smleaf

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  1. This election cost $88 million I believe. Charest was unfortunately rewarded for this unnecessary election because people wanted to stop any more elections for a few years.

    Mario Dumont was a great representative of the more entrepreneurial regions of Quebec and the 'younger' generation. He had attended Concordia Univ. in Montreal and understood anglophones and allophones more than your average Quebec politician.

    But in Quebec most of the media and intelligentsia are leftist, so it is hard to get good coverage.

    Anyway he got caught in the squeeze between those wanting a majority and those wanting to send a message to Harper that separatism is not dead.

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